Pro Multis: For All or For Many?

Can you believe it’s almost been a year since we started the new translation of the Mass? “And with your spirit!” I was so distressed when we first began because I had just gotten the hang of the old translation. I even had the creed down by heart. Now, I’m pretty much in step with the new translation, but I couldn’t say the creed to save my life! I keep meaning to sit down with it and go over it one bite at a time, but, well,….I haven’t!

I’m so very glad for the new translation. It has given us a far more robust liturgy and forced us to think about the words we are saying instead of just going on autopilot. For your pleasure, some highlights of the new translation and my scattered thoughts on them.

Mea Culpa!

Quite possibly my favorite change of the Mass is the Penitential Rite. For those of you who don’t know/don’t remember, it went from this…

I confess to almighty God,
and to you, my brothers and sisters,
that I have sinned through my own fault
in my thoughts and in my words,
in what I have done, and in what I have failed to do;
and I ask blessed Mary, ever virgin,
all the angels and saints,
and you, my brothers and sisters,
to pray for me to the Lord our God.

To the much more penitential…

I confess to almighty God,
and to you, my brothers and sisters,
that I have greatly sinned
in my thoughts and in my words,
in what I have done, and in what I have failed to do,
through my fault, through my fault,
through my most grievous fault;

therefore I ask blessed Mary ever-Virgin,
all the Angels and Saints,
and you, my brothers and sisters,
to pray for me to the Lord our God.

It’s like the most divine poetry! “I have greatly sinned!….through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault!” {exclamation points added at the full discretion of the convert} Far, far better than “I have sinned through my own fault,” don’t you think? However, when one ponders the original latin…

Confíteor Deo omnipoténti, beátæ Maríæ semper Vírgini, beáto Michǽli Archángelo, beáto Ioánni Baptístæ, sanctis Apóstolis Petro et Páulo, ómnibus Sanctis, et vobis, fratres: quia peccávi nimis cogitatióne, verbo, et ópere: mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa. Ideo precor beátam Maríam semper Virginem, beátum Michǽlem Archángelum, beátum Ioánnem Baptístam, sanctos Apóstolos Petrum et Páulum, omnes Sanctos, et vos, fratres, oráre pro me ad Dóminum Deum nostrum.

…one does have to wonder if the original translators were phoning it in the day they translated “mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa” to “my bad.”

The same logic must have applied when translating “Et cum spiritu tuo” to “Right back atcha.”

I’m Not Worthy!

In Communion, there’s just something about “Behold the Lamb of God!” It demands our attention so much more urgently than merely stating “This is the Lamb of God.” Behold! Look! See! This is the one who takes away the sins of the world! Drop what you’re doing and behold! Also, saying “Lord, I am not worthy to receive you” doesn’t quite inspire the same kind of deep contemplation as “Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof.” My dwelling place is not worthy of Your presence and yet You have chosen to make me Your dwelling place? Lord, I’m not worthy! But in a word, He can heal, not only this broken, disposable body of mine, but my eternal soul. In a word! I’m not worthy, Lord!

For All or For Many?

I’ve gotten carried away, I’m afraid, and nearly forgotten why I started this post in the first place. Perseverance is about to pay off for you, dear reader, because you’ve just read an inexcusably long introduction to a much better post!

One of the changes in the mass that has stood out to me like a sore thumb is during the Consecration of the Eucharist. Of course, I could have done some research, or even just, I don’t know, read one of the many guides to the new translation of the Mass I bought/was given. Instead, I just waited around until the ever insightful Dr. Taylor Marshall proactively explained it all.

I am, of course, referring to the change from this…

Take this, all of you, and drink from it: this is the cup of my blood, the blood of the new and everlasting covenant.  It will be shed for you and for all so that sins may be forgiven.  Do this in memory of me.

…to this…

Take this, all of you, and drink from it: for this is the chalice of my Blood, the Blood of the new and eternal covenant, which will be poured out for you and for many for the forgiveness of sins. 

Specifically the change from “for all” to “for many.” Dr. Marshall, as always, goes into great detail on his blog. The difference is chilling, even a year later.

It’s not “for all,” it’s “for many.” All won’t be saved. We must testify, we must pray for the souls of those who reject Christ. It’s only a difference of a single word, but there is an endless chasm between the two.

 

Advertisements
Categories: Chasing After God, Everything Else | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Post navigation

One thought on “Pro Multis: For All or For Many?

  1. Pingback: Happy Anniversary to the New Mass! « Patron Saint of Indecisiveness

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: